Price, of course. Prices are expressed in cents/kilowatt hour. Plan types include fixed rates and variable rates. Fixed rates offer consistency throughout the plan term, which can run from six to 36 months. Variable rates can change monthly - they're great when prices go down, but not-so-great when they don't. Finally, if you care about your carbon footprint, you may choose a plan sourced by solar or wind energy.
Price, of course. Prices are expressed in cents/kilowatt hour. Plan types include fixed rates and variable rates. Fixed rates offer consistency throughout the plan term, which can run from six to 36 months. Variable rates can change monthly - they're great when prices go down, but not-so-great when they don't. Finally, if you care about your carbon footprint, you may choose a plan sourced by solar or wind energy.
Twenty-nine states have deregulated electricity, natural gas or both. That allows you to shop for the supply portion of your bill from alternative providers who may offer rates lower than the default supplier – usually a utility. Delivery services and billing will remain the responsibility of the local utility as they own the power lines and wires that keep the lights on.
In order to actually know what your monthly bill would be, and how it is going to be determined, you’ll need to know about how much energy you use each month and do some simple math to determine how their rates will affect your monthly bills. Without doing this, you’ll end up paying a rate that isn’t anywhere near what you saw advertised because many energy companies show only their lowest rates for high energy users in their marketing.

Choose a new energy provider option that fits your needs. Once you determine which provider you want to use, make sure to do all your research on the company. Make sure that they are accredited by your local energy commission or government and read user reviews. If you want to help the environment, it may also be beneficial to choose a company that uses renewable sources of energy. Determine which plan you want to switch to and save the link to the page.[7]


You can switch power supply providers to find more agreeable terms, snag a better rate or get green electricity. If you have a month-to-month plan for your power supply, switch at the end of any billing month. If you are locked into a longer contract and want to exit early, you may want to investigate what fees may be assessed if you switch. Power supply will be the same when you switch power providers, so you don't have to worry about sub-standard electricity supply.


Multi-year electricity contracts are not unusual; this method of structuring customer timelines is. Our guess: It’s a holdover style of billing from FirstEnergy’s involvement with governmental aggregations — municipal groups that get together and buy their energy as a community. Rather than have the option of a long term or short term plan, consumers are forced to take what’s available to them at the time.
The takeaway here is simple. As is the case in Washington and Iceland, if a state or country has an abundance of natural resources, it should take advantage of them to drive down the price of a kWh to attract businesses. Diversification is especially essential where possible. Without businesses and industries paying to draw power from the electrical grid, the local economy stagnates.
Several states have Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) laws that allow local governments to pool their community’s electricity need in order to purchase power on their behalf.  While savings is not always guaranteed, many municipalities are able to obtain discounted electricity prices. You’ll have to check with your state regulatory commission. You can get started by clicking on your state in this map.
In order to actually know what your monthly bill would be, and how it is going to be determined, you’ll need to know about how much energy you use each month and do some simple math to determine how their rates will affect your monthly bills. Without doing this, you’ll end up paying a rate that isn’t anywhere near what you saw advertised because many energy companies show only their lowest rates for high energy users in their marketing.
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