Price, of course. Prices are expressed in cents/kilowatt hour. Plan types include fixed rates and variable rates. Fixed rates offer consistency throughout the plan term, which can run from six to 36 months. Variable rates can change monthly - they're great when prices go down, but not-so-great when they don't. Finally, if you care about your carbon footprint, you may choose a plan sourced by solar or wind energy.

Choose a new energy provider option that fits your needs. Once you determine which provider you want to use, make sure to do all your research on the company. Make sure that they are accredited by your local energy commission or government and read user reviews. If you want to help the environment, it may also be beneficial to choose a company that uses renewable sources of energy. Determine which plan you want to switch to and save the link to the page.[7]


Released October 26, 2018 | tags: CO2all fuel sourcesbiofuelscapacity factorcoalcommercial+consumption/demandcrude oilelectricityemissionsenvironmentexports/importsgenerating capacitygenerationgreenhouse gaseshydroelectricindustrialinternationalmonthlymost popularnatural gasnuclearoil/petroleumproduction/supplyrenewablesresidentialsolartotal energytransportationwindwood
Electric bills for customers in the Houston area can more than double in summer months, mainly because air conditioning. Not coincidentally, electric rates also rise in the summer months because of this increase in demand. The most dramatic rate increases occur in month-to-month plans, but electric rates do increase across the board for all fixed-rate contract lengths.
If you’re on a fixed rate tariff with your current supplier, check to see if there’s an exit fee for leaving the contract early. If there is, you’ll need to factor this cost into your price comparison as it could swallow up some of the potential savings. If you can supply your tariff name when you get a quote, we can take your tariff into account when showing you the savings you could make.
There was a time when electricity was electricity.  Like so many other places around America, in Houston, electricity didn’t mean “cheap electricity”.  But you moved into your home and you called the utility and they turned on the power and the bill came in and you paid it every month.  Oh, sure, you might grumble at the amount but then you’d go around and yell at the kids for leaving the lights on and the TV blaring with nobody in the room or maybe you’d look into buying more energy-efficient appliances.  When it came down to it, the Bill was the Bill.  Either you paid the bill or you ate dry packet meals, had cold showers, and watched TV by peering through the neighbor’s window after dark (preferably once they’d turned the TV on).  What’s that?  You want cheap electricity?  Sure thing:  call 1-800-WHO-CARES any time during regular business hours of 2:17am to 3:04am Sundays only.
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