The Price to Compare is calculated by taking the total kilowatt-hour usage for all customers within a specific rate class for a 12-month period and multiplying that amount by the actual generation and transmission rates. This total amount is then divided by the total 12-month kilowatt-hour usage which provides an average per kilowatt-hour rate for generation and transmission for the rate class, which is the Price to Compare.

That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
In the early 1990s, the federal government began to pass legislation to open the retail energy market in an effort to give consumers additional choices for electricity and natural gas providers. Some state legislatures then followed, but not every state allows for energy competition. Before you begin to shop around for energy rates, you will need to find out whether there is energy competition in your state.
The price of electricity can be affected by a wide variety of factors. These can range from coal, gas and oil prices and changing distribution costs to unexpected weather such as a particularly cold winter. Electricity prices are further complicated by the fact energy supplies often purchase energy many months or even years in advance to hedge their costs.
Texas deregulated most of the state's electricity markets in 2002, a move aimed at lowering electricity costs by letting consumers choose their own electric power providers and their own plans. Some parts of Texas continued to be regulated, including those that get power from municipal utilities, electric cooperatives and investor-owned utilities that operate outside the state's primary power grid.
The utility – or local distribution company – owns and operates the way electricity or natural gas is delivered to homes and businesses. The infrastructure that brings energy to homes, businesses and industrial facilities is owned by the traditional utility company. While your local utility reads your usage meter and bills you on a monthly basis, the transmission and distribution charges are set by regulators. 
uSwitch 2018 customer ratings are based on an independent YouGov survey that was conducted between 7 November and 1 December 2017. A total of 17,313 UK energy customers were asked to rate their energy supplier on overall satisfaction, transfer process, value for money, customer service and how likely they were to recommend. We equally weighted those five scores across suppliers with at least 50 responses to create an average supplier rating for each.
Landsvirkun, Iceland’s national power company, offers electricity to buyers for as low as $0.043 per kWh, which is nearly on par with what can be found in Washington State. Coupled with 20% corporate tax, the nation’s low energy prices have attracted not just data centers, methanol producers, silicon metal producers but also aluminum companies—which, again, consume massive amounts of electricity.
We've partnered with The Foundation for Learning and Youth Travel Education (FLYTE), a nonprofit organization that empowers youth living in underserved communities through transformative travel experiences. FLYTE teaches that we are more alike than we realize. By bridging the gap between fear and understanding, FLYTE empowers future generations by connecting them to the world.
In order to provide complete functionality, this web site needs your explicit consent to store browser cookies. If you don't allow cookies, you may not be able to use certain features of the web site including but not limited to: log in, buy products, see personalized content, switch between site cultures. It is recommended that you allow all cookies.
×